3 Common Email Marketing Challenges

In my earlier blog post I highlighted why all companies including time-strapped startups should have a robust email marketing channel, and how to go about building it. I extolled the many benefits of an email marketing channel for startups and bigger brands alike. It sounds so simple. Then what are the few reasons due to which a lot of companies fail in their email marketing attempts? Here are 3 common email marketing challenges I have come across in most companies I have worked with,

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There is no end to business seniors and entrepreneurs looking to put strong marketing channels in place for their company. But most of their efforts remain half baked, because No Time. Better known as No BANDWIDTH in startup circles. I have helped lots of startups with their digital marketing activities, I keep in mind that most activities need to be very effective with least effort. So typically my first suggestion to most businesses is : Build an Email marketing channel!

Not only does email marketing have some of the highest conversion rates in the industry but it is also one of the most neglected.

Depending on the bandwidth available, the frequency of email can be adjusted and then if done right, it can become one of the most efficient and effective marketing channel for the business.

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I have exactly 3 blog posts in the entire year on this blog, and one of them is the annual review of 2015. 😀

It seems this blog might become a log of my work experiences of the year. This year was crazy on many fronts – professional, travel and personal so I am finding these year end blogs tougher to write than usual. But here goes…

In-House v/s Agency

One big change in this year – I was mostly dedicated to one project as in-house Marketing Head. And I realised I really enjoy focusing on one project this way. It allows me to get into it and figure out the nitty gritties. There were some clear advantages to working in-house

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I don’t do much of business reading, but I like a good autobiography. The previous one I read a while back was Sam Walton’s Made in America. It was an intriguing read. I still remember how Sam Walton, founder of Walmart had valued the buck as a kid and never really lost that habit of looking for Value For Money in everything he did. Recently I picked up Akio Morita’s Made in Japan – surprising how both the books have the similar name style. 🙂

I was intrigued to know more about Akio, because Sony has been a household name since ages, I still remember how I spent hours listening to my walkman as a kid. Now a days it is all available on mobile and the days of the tape are gone still I was intrigued to know about the company. I had no idea about it’s history at all. What also intrigued me was to know more about the Japanese work culture and industrialization history. And this book really provides insights into a lot of it. Here are some snippets that I find worth sharing (there were many of those, I am sharing the ones I remember now. 😉 )

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The other day I had a talk in a entrepreneurship cell event at KJ Somaiya college. I spoke about Branding for Startups…

Having worked with a large number of startups at DigiWhirl in different stages – one person startups, 5 – 10 people, 25-30 people and then of course bigger companies as well – Branding is an interesting topic for startups because a lot of times they don’t really do any major branding. A lot of people that met me after the talk were wondering about what branding to put in place when they were really Early Stage startups – like just a few months into their company.

Typically in early stage the focus of the startup should be on fine tuning their deliverable whether it is product or service. Also unless already funded, there won’t be any employees or just the bare minimum employee strength which means the founding team is doing everything. So practically in terms of time and money it is never possible to put in a great branding in place.

So what I suggest to them is to set up a really, basic branding in place. This shouldn’t take more than a days brainstorming within the team. Request an experienced entrepreneur or marketing person to be part of this session if possible. Then you can just quickly wrap this up. Because the most important thing in early days is speed so you can test out your product/service and get enough market feedback to ensure this is a viable venture.

Quote for Early Stage Startups

Remember, all your branding elements need to be created keeping in mind the person it is intended for.

 

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A long time since I penned down a post on this blog.

I have many insights into work, entrepreneurship and marketing but I find it difficult to post it, somehow.

I take year end reviews seriously, so I am pushing myself to write this post,

The Year 2014-2015 was a thrill ride when I look back at it. And a very hard one at that. In Jan 2014 I setup an office for DigiWhirl, my digital marketing company. Managed an offline team for the first time.

Offline Team Management: is different from virtual one. In virtual work setups – deliverables are central and socializing takes a back seat. I did socialize and set up some HR engagement aspects when I had a virtual team but honestly it is all a lot lighter than when you are offline. In the office all the time there is some level of socializing going on and every personal hit to any team member affects everyone as the setup is small. So as usual had a whole bunch of mad experiences with my team.

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Lately I have been spending a lot of time in office, which happens to be a co-working space. So I have gotten some insight and experience into the woes of an employee. One insight that has lately been growing on me is that – people end up spoiling relations or quitting because they fail to speak up and have a simple conversation.

Here are some situations where I feel, the situation would be much better handled if the employee speaks up….

1) Non-core activities are sucking the life out of the Job

Most employees are hired for one core purpose. Apart from that core work they are also given many non-core responsibilities. In a startup often the non-core responsibilities can be many! Firstly, identify your core job – discuss with boss if needed. Any tasks which are non-core, if they are really obstructing your peace – just raise the issue and get it out of the way. Make it clear that you will do your core job to the best of your ability – and ensure that it is getting done well. So once you are doing your main work, the company will be more than happy to sort the other stuff for you.

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